Investing Basics

Why Companies Split Their Stock: Slide Series Edition

by Christopher Bélanger & Max Kirouac
October 28, 2020
October 28, 2020

Why Companies Split Their Stock 101

Ever wonder why publicly traded companies split their stock? Use this slide deck to understand their rationale for doing so alongside a recent example of Apple’s stock split that most recently occurred on August 31, 2020.

Link to the full Modern Money article here.

why do companies split their stock

About Christopher Bélanger

Chris is a business lawyer and a co-founder of Modern Money. Chris is originally from Winnipeg but now splits time between Winnipeg and Calgary.

About Max Kirouac

Max Kirouac, CFA®, is an Investment Counsellor at BMO Private Banking in Winnipeg, Manitoba. If you would like to discuss this article more with Max, connect with him on LinkedIn.

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